Now Get Up and Go: DANIEL 11-12

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DANIEL 11:35-12

As I write today I am battling grief, fear, anger and angst for our world.

I grieve over the loss of what once was our nation. There was a time when by and large the worst things I faced over Christmas was controlling the look on my face when I received Aunt Marge’s annual, awful fruit cake or perhaps learning to navigate the holiday missing a loved one. The weight of what our country faces today, feels more imminent now than ever before.

I fear what’s beginning to feel like a new normal. Radicalism consumed with hate and violence grows, and I watch it happen. And let’s not pretend this kind of radicalism is relegated to only one walk of life. In just a few weeks’ time we’ve seen Paris, Planned Parenthood, and an unsuspecting workplace party viciously attacked, among many more in war-ravaged, desperate nations in the Middle East and around the world.

I’m angry when I see our world leaders responding in fear and rhetoric, rather than turning to God. God wants nothing more than our hearts, but we stubbornly refuse him. We make our plans as if we know better. The higher we build our walls and the deeper we fill our cache of ammunition, we become more and more vulnerable. But this isn’t new.

Judah’s defenses have been stripped away.

You run to the armory for your weapons.

You inspect the breaks in the walls of Jerusalem.

You store up water in the lower pool.

You survey the houses and tear some down for stone to strengthen the wall.

Between the city walls, you build a reservoir for water from the old pool.

But you never ask for help from the One who did all this. You never considered the One who planned this long ago. (Isaiah 22:8-11 NLT)

And I’m anxious when I read the text we are studying today in Daniel, because I see our world mirrored in its words. Is this it? Have we arrived? What do I do with this?

THE TIME OF THE END

Daniel ends his writings with a final vision. In the previous lesson, we covered the first part of the vision that most scholars believe to be largely fulfilled already. The latter part of chapter 11 and chapter 12 seem to be talking about Antichrist and his rise to power, which still remain in the future.

The king will do as he pleases, exalting himself and claiming to be greater than every god, even blaspheming the God of gods. (Daniel 11:36a NLT)

We are told that this ruler will be a man of war and violence, and that he will conquer many lands and nations. We are also told that his days are numbered and he will succeed in everything he does for a predetermined period of time.

He will succeed, but only until the time of wrath is completed. For what has been determined will surely take place. (Daniel 11:36b NLT)

It will be a time of great anguish, but not devoid of grace and salvation.

But at that time every one of your people whose name is written in the book will be rescued. (Daniel 12:1b NLT)

The heavenly messenger tells Daniel that there will be a resurrection of the dead, and that some will rise to everlasting life and some to everlasting shame. (Daniel 12:2) He also tells Daniel how long these things will last, “for a time, times, and half a time,” (12:7) and later he says that from the time the daily sacrifices are stopped 1,290 days will pass (12:11). And yet despite all the detail, the vision is still shrouded in mystery.

I heard what he said, but I did not understand what he meant. So I asked, “How will all this finally end, my lord?” (Daniel 12:8 NLT)

So it’s with this question I want to settle today, “What if we hear what God says, but we still don’t understand what he means?” If you can identify, you are not alone!

WHAT DO WE UNDERSTAND?

From the outset of this study I have talked about the pattern of God’s will. It’s displayed multiple times throughout scripture, and if you look closely, you’ll see it displayed in your own life as well, probably more than once. The pattern is this:

Basic Pattern Israel’s purpose when they crossed the Jordan into the Promised Land was to make God’s name known among the nations, to be a light to the world.   God chose these people as his own, so that when he set them apart as holy, the entire world would begin to know God through the picture of Israel. He uses the Church in much the same way today. One dramatic difference: Christ lives in each of us today, and when we step into our purpose and calling, we individually and collectively make Christ visible to the world.

In conjunction with other prophetic texts, we know that when this time of wrath has completed, Christ will return, the dead in Christ will rise to be transformed and those who are still alive will also be transformed. Christ will then establish his Kingdom and rule with love. When Christ returns, all purpose will be completed in full. There will no longer be a need to make his name known to the world, because he will be known.

For the scriptures say, “’As surely as I live,’ says the Lord, ’every knee will bend to me, and every tongue will confess and give praise to God.’” (Romans 14:11 NLT)

I go back to this pattern of Captivity -> Preparation -> Purpose, because even if we don’t understand all that God has planned and all that God has revealed, if we understand this much, we can still move actively into the story of God’s redemptive plan. When Daniel said he heard what the messenger said, but didn’t understand, the response to Daniel was telling.

But he said, “Go now…” (Daniel 12:9 NLT)

Daniel didn’t get a direct answer to his question. In fact, he was told the answers were going to be kept secret until the time of the end. The messenger then reiterates his command in verse 13.

“As for you, go your way until the end.” (Daniel 12:13a NLT)

He’s telling Daniel to keep walking the path designed for him, and leave the rest to God. So even if we don’t understand all that we hear God saying, we just need to keep on following what we do hear from him. Easy enough, right? Right…until the doubts creep in about the path we’re on and we start asking God, “what if?”

WHAT IF… I’M NOT EQUIPPED TO WALK THIS PATH?

If you’re asking this question, you are not the first. Moses asked it and so did Jeremiah.   God doesn’t often call the equipped, he typically equips the called. You can be sure, that if God has called you, he will supply you with all that you need to follow him.

All praise to God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly realms because we are united with Christ. (Ephesians 1:3 NLT)

This is a great place to start, because it means each of us is the perfect candidate to be called by God. He has supplied with all spiritual blessings, ALL, which means they don’t come in installments. They are all there from the moment of faith. Blessings like forgiveness, grace, eternity, gifts and insight from the Holy Spirit, and most of all power to follow God. These blessings are a pretty good foundational start to any and all callings.

When I first heard the call to write, it surprised me, and my first reaction was, “surely not.” But now that I have pursued this for a couple of years, the Lord has brought to my memory writing classes that I took in college, and literature classes that I loved. I had all but forgotten that I entertained a desire to major in English and Literature for a short period of time, but quickly dismissed it because it just didn’t make sense. Even then, God was preparing me.

As you consider your life up to now, you might begin to see that God has worked in a similar way. All the threads will eventually weave your story. Follow the path faithfully, and your journey will provide you with the necessary experience and qualifications to keep moving forward.

WHAT IF… I’M NOT STRONG ENOUGH TO WALK THIS PATH

When Israel approached the Promised Land and was told of the incredible bounty within, they could only hear the reports of the giants. Fear told them they were not strong enough to defeat the giants, and how irresponsible it would be to cross over with little children in their care.

Let’s just get this one out of the way. You’re not strong enough to walk this path. None of us are. But God still calls us anyway.

Each time he said, “My grace is all you need. My power works best in weakness.” So now I am glad to boast about my weaknesses, so that the power of Christ can work through me. That’s why I take pleasure in my weaknesses, and in the insults, hardships, persecutions, and troubles that I suffer for Christ. For when I am weak, then I am strong. (II Corinthians 12: 9-10 NLT)

There were many, many times God told Israel to show up to a battle ill-equipped or he asked them to send the majority of their soldiers home. He told Gideon, he didn’t want Israel to think they won the battle in their own strength. He wanted them to understand it was through the power of God. To be clear, every success, every victory we claim, is ALL through the power of God.

WHAT IF…I SUFFER ON THIS PATH

Suffering is very possible, in fact very probable. However, trials and suffering are uniquely designed to equip, strengthen, and to ultimately create extreme effectiveness. By the way, this is also called worship, and worship is the only way to abide in Christ.

Dear brothers and sisters, when troubles come your way, consider it an opportunity for great joy. For you know that when your faith is tested, your endurance has a chance to grow. So let it grow, for when your endurance is fully developed, you will be perfect and complete, needing nothing. (James 1:2-4 NLT)

We can rejoice, too, when we run into problems and trials, for we know that they help us develop endurance. And endurance develops strength of character, and character strengthens our confident hope of salvation. (Romans 5:3-4 NLT)

Daniel doesn’t mince words. Terrible suffering will mark the time of the end for God’s holy people. But what does God say about that?

Many will be purified, cleansed, and refined by these trials. (Daniel 12:10 NLT)

We can trust that any trial we walk will bring great glory to God and then that glory will be reflected back on us.

WHAT IF…I CHOOSE NOT TO WALK THIS PATH

There is certainly a great cost to following God, and many of us wonder if we can afford it. And we wonder if we can afford it, because we’re comparing the cost of following God to the lie that there is no cost if we choose not to follow. There is a cost, and it’s called opportunity cost.

Israel chose not to cross the Jordan River because they feared the cost of going into a land of giants. What they didn’t fully factor was the cost of missing the promise God held for them on the other side of the river.

The Apostle Paul also talks about opportunity cost in his first letter to the Corinthians. The context here is Paul’s concern for sin among the believers and their commitment to holiness.

Don’t you realize that those who do wrong will not inherit the Kingdom of God? (I Corinthians 6:9a NLT)

While I want to be careful to maintain the context of this passage, I do believe we can find an application for God’s call on levels of our life. His call for our life will typically follow the pattern of his will as I mentioned earlier.

Captivity

When we are held captive by sin and death, outside of a relationship with Christ, his call on our life will be to place our faith in him. If we reject God’s call to salvation, then we will most definitely not inherit any form of the Kingdom of God.

Preparation

After we’ve placed our faith in him, he will lead us into a period of growth and renewal. His call on our life is to holiness. He will teach us and heal us, and will prepare trials and hardships to cleanse and purify our lives. If we reject this call, misusing the liberty we have in Christ to continue sinning, our sin will prevent the continual expression of the Kingdom in our lives today. The Kingdom is expressed through the blessings referenced in Ephesians that I mentioned earlier. Paul was very concerned for the Corinthians in this area.

Purpose

We are all being prepared for a purpose. His call on our life, our purpose, is as unique as our DNA. If we are earnestly pursuing Christ and his holiness, God will guide and direct our path into a purpose that will make his name known to the world. If we reject this call, it’s not so much a missed inheritance, but rather a missed opportunity to experience and realize the vast fullness of the Kingdom of God that is available right now. We might experience some of it, but not all of it. If you’ll follow me, that opportunity cost is essentially missing the inheritance that he has for us.

NOW GO

We don’t have to understand everything about the Bible, or everything about prophecy, or everything about evangelism to walk the path before us. That much is clear from Daniel. We have everything we need to begin, and will be supplied with what we lack to continue, and are continually empowered by the Holy Spirit to get up and go. Now go.

Doomsday Prepper & Everyone Else: DANIEL 7-8

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Daniel 7-8

Daniel saw things. Things that were so disturbing it made him sick to his stomach. Things of evil and terror that keeps one awake at night.

I, Daniel, was terrified by my thoughts and my face was pale with fear, but I kept these things to myself. (Daniel 7:28b NLT)

Then I, Daniel, was overcome and lay sick for several days. Afterward I got up and performed my duties for the king, but I was greatly troubled by the vision and could not understand it. (Daniel 8:27 NLT)

This wasn’t the first glimpse into the future by Daniel, yet it dealt a heavier blow, leaving Daniel pale with terror. What made these visions so different? Well for one thing, they came with quite a bit more detail and explanation.  And another, they weren’t all rainbows and unicorns.  Chronologically these two visions came to Daniel in the first three years of Belshazzar’s reign, before chapter 5. It’s no wonder Daniel didn’t hesitate when reading the writing on the wall; these visions provided ample explanation… and then some.

What does one do with information like this? For Daniel, in that moment, he kept it to himself, not sharing until years later. Why did God reveal these future terrors to Daniel and then to the rest of us? What are we supposed to do with it? Are we doomed? Before we dive into the details of these two chapters, the question that must remain throughout all our study and discussion is this: how does this text fit into the puzzle of God’s redemptive story? Because, after all, his redemption is really the whole point.

WHAT DO THE SCHOLARS SAY?

Let’s begin with the vision in chapter seven. It begins with the winged lion coming out of the sea, followed by a devouring bear, followed by a 4-winged / 4-headed leopard, and finally followed by a fourth beast, more terrifying than the rest. This beast came with no physical description per se; except that it had huge, iron teeth, bronze claws, and ten horns. Then suddenly a small horn emerged, taking out three of the original ten horns to make room for it. This little horn claimed human eyes and a mouth and boasted arrogantly.

Now let’s jump to the vision in chapter eight. In this vision we see two animals portrayed: a two-horned ram and a one-horned goat. The goat fiercely attacks the ram, subduing it quickly. At the height of the goat’s power, its horn was broken and replaced by four horns pointing in all directions of the earth, until from one of those horns another small horn emerged with great power. This small horn challenged a heavenly authority, an angel or perhaps God himself, bringing desecration to the Temple of God.

By considering the vision from Nebuchadnezzar’s dream in conjunction with the explanation of these two visions in chapters seven and eight, plus the annals of recorded history as we know it, scholars have pieced together a plausible interpretation. But let’s be clear, no one can say for sure exactly what the prophecy entails for our world. There are literally thousands of possible pathways for these prophecies to complete. The only the things we know for sure are the limited explanations  provided directly in scripture.

Four Succession Kingdoms

The four beasts in chapter seven seem to correlate strongly with the four major divisions of the statue in Nebuchadnezzar’s dream, which Daniel explained at that time as representing dominant kingdoms. The angel speaking to Daniel in this week’s text confirmed the same meaning for these beasts.

These four huge beasts represent four kingdoms that will arise from the earth. (Daniel 7:17 NLT)

If the correlation between this vision and that of Nebuchadnezzar’s is indeed valid, then the winged lion would correlate to the head of gold in the statue, the devouring bear would correlate to the chest of silver, the four-headed leopard to the torso of bronze, and the fourth beast to the legs and feet of iron and iron/clay.

Daniel’s interpretation in chapter two confirms that the first earthly government is Babylon. The interpretation in chapter eight gives more clarity to the succeeding two governments. Gabriel explains that the two-horned ram represents the growing power of Media and Persia; a government ruled by two kings that eventually overthrew Babylon.

The 3rd Kingdom

Gabriel goes on to explain that Greece would follow, represented by the one horned goat coming out of the west. History tells us that Alexander the Great, the first king of the Greek Empire and infamous military leader, took the world by storm with incredible speed, subduing the Medes and the Persians and most of the known world.

The goat became very powerful. But at the height of his power, his large horn was broken off. In the large horn’s place grew four prominent horns pointing in the four directions of the earth. (Daniel 8:8 NLT)

Alexander soon died at 32 years of age (323 BC), the height of his success. His four generals (Cassander, Ptolemy, Antigonus, and Seleucus) assumed power by dividing the empire into four regions.

The four prominent horns that replaced the one large horn show that the Greek Empire will break into four kingdoms, but none as great as the first. (Daniel 8:22 NLT)

Daniel’s vision in chapter eight continues with a smaller horn rising up from one of the four horns on the goat, and pouring out great terror on the land of Israel (Dan 8:9). Most scholars believe that Antiochus Epiphanes (meaning “God Manifest” in Greek), who arose as the king from the region of Seleucid less than 150 years after the death of Alexander, was the fulfillment of this piece. Speaking of the smaller horn:

It even challenged the Commander of heaven’s army by canceling the daily sacrifices offered to him and by destroying his Temple.   (Daniel 8:11 NLT)

Known also as Antiochus Epimanes (the Mad) by those who crossed him, he certainly desecrated the Temple by erecting an idol of Zeus and offering sacrifices at the feet of an idol in his own image. Tradition has it that he sacrificed a pig (considered to be most unclean by Jews) and sprinkled its blood all over the Temple, essentially destroying it and its holiness.  Worshiping Yahweh and all Jewish rites were punished by death.

The 4th Kingdom

Chapter eight only discusses the two dominant kingdoms represented by the ram and the goat. They correlate to the bear and the leopard in the seventh chapter as well as by the silver chest and bronze torso in Nebuchadnezzar’s statue. Chapter seven states there is a fourth kingdom prophesied to succeed the leopard (also the goat).

This fourth beast is the fourth world power that will rule the earth. It will be different from all the others. It will devour the whole world, trampling and crushing everything in its path. (Daniel 7:23 NLT)

The fourth beast is described as having ten horns, which represent ten kings who will rule this empire. The little horn that comes up is described as different from the other ten, and seems to solidify his power by subduing and eliminated three of those kings. (Dan 7:24) This king will also oppress the holy people by changing sacred festivals and laws, and placing them under his control.

There could be a possible correlation of these ten horns to the ten toes in Nebuchadnezzar’s statue, but almost certainly a correlation with the beast’s ten horns described in the Book of Revelation.

Then I saw a beast rising up out of the sea. It had seven heads and ten horns, with ten crowns on its horns. And written on each head were names that blasphemed God. (Revelation 13:1 NLT)

Interestingly, this beast that John describes in Revelation looks like a leopard, with feet like a bear and a mouth like a lion. All three of the other beasts mentioned in chapter seven of Daniel. Most scholars believe that this fourth kingdom in chapter seven is describing the final rebellion before the return of Christ, and that the little horn with eyes and a mouth is the Antichrist. While the fourth kingdom in Nebuchadnezzar’s statue is believed to be Rome, the parallels with this fourth kingdom in chapter seven to those described in Revelation are striking.

Some believe that the little horn in chapter eight is also describing the final Antichrist rather than Antiochus, due to the similar description, but because the little horn in chapter eight appears to arise out of the third kingdom, not the fourth, most tend to rule that out. Regardless, Antiochus at the very least is a picture of what is to still yet to come in the final rebellion. We know that Antiochus didn’t fulfill the prediction of the Antichrist in the 4th kingdom because Jesus refers to Daniel’s prediction as yet a future warning (Matthew 24:15), and the Apostle John wrote his revelation over 200 years after Antiochus.

We could go into a great more detail in these prophecies and the connections to Revelation, but there simply isn’t time here. Overall, these prophecies concern the immediate kingdoms that followed Babylon, including the world power and final rebellion before Christ’s return. Back to our original question, what do we do with this and how does it fit into redemption?

WHAT DO WE SEE IN OUR WORLD TODAY?

It’s quite possible that some of you signed up to study the Book of Daniel this fall, eagerly anticipating these two chapters. You were aware of the prophecies contained herein, and you’ve been wondering if we are living in those end-days right now. You’ve hoped to have that answered today.

It’s quite possible some of you have dreaded these two chapters all season. You were aware of the prophecies contained herein, and you’ve wondered if it would erupt into sensationalized discussion, bouts of tears, arguments, and the stockpiling of canned goods.

When it comes to end times prophecies, it’s critical to maintain an appropriate balance of wary concern to disregard. An extreme focus either way could result in confusion and distraction from our primary goal to know Him and to be with Him.

Looking for Christ

I believe God places within his holy people a longing and desire for the Kingdom. Scripture says that there was awareness and anticipation for Messiah at the time Jesus was born. The people who sought the Lord knew of Daniel’s timeline prophecy in chapter nine, and the time was drawing very close. They were looking for him.

At that time there was a man in Jerusalem named Simeon. He was righteous and devout and was eagerly waiting for the Messiah to come and rescue Israel. The Holy Spirit was upon him and had revealed to him that he would not die until he had seen the Lord’s Messiah. (Luke 2:25 NLT)

Anna, a prophet, was also there in the Temple…She talked about the child to everyone who had been waiting expectantly for God to rescue Jerusalem. (Luke 2: 36,38b NLT)

Now there was a good and righteous man named Joseph. He was a member of the Jewish high council, but he had not agreed with the decision and actions of the other religious leaders. He was from the town of Arimathea in Judea, and he was waiting for the Kingdom of God to come. (Luke 23:50-51 NLT)

It’s appropriate to eagerly expect our Lord. He wants us to want him.  It’s okay to look around and wait for him, despite our inability to explain the longing. Jesus also warns us to be watchful and alert, always ready for his return at any moment.

“The day is coming when you will see what Daniel the prophet spoke about – the sacrilegious object that causes desecration standing in the Holy Place.” Reader, pay attention! (Matthew 24:15 NLT)

Looking for Truth

Each believer in Jesus should honestly study prophecy for herself. Understand and consider what the scholars suggest, and then ask God what it is he wants you to see in the scripture. Look around your world, follow the news if you wish, and examine the signs if there are any. Then ask God what it is he wants you to see in the world.

In Daniel’s second vision he said “truth was overthrown” in those final days. In times of sinful rebellion, truth is always overthrown. It’s one of the reasons Jesus has handed down these prophecies, so that we night have a basis of truth for comparison. He tells us to be watchful and alert so that we aren’t deceived into ignoring the signs.

It isn’t wise to completely disregard any possibility for signs of the end times, but it probably isn’t appropriate to see end times prophecies in every news program, government official, or piece of burnt toast either. The danger of “seeing” end-times everywhere is a different kind of deception, which I’ll get back to.

WHAT ARE WE REALLY LOOKING FOR?

One critical part of this passage in that has yet to be discussed, is the piece that describes all that’s right in the world. Daniel sees the Ancient One who sits on his throne in a court that will pass judgment on evil. (Dan 7:9-10, 26) He tells of the authority of the Son of Man and his eternal rule.

Then the sovereignty, power, and greatness of all the kingdoms under heaven will be given to the holy people of the Most High. His kingdom will last forever, and all rulers will serve and obey him. (Daniel 7:27 NLT)

Yes, be watchful and alert for signs of the end times, but what we’re really looking for is the Kingdom. Like I mentioned last week in chapter six, keep your eye on the angel rather than the hungry lion.

Scripture points clearly to a physical manifestation of a coming kingdom when Jesus returns.  The stuff of dreams.  Use caution, however, when searching for signs in our world. They can easily distract from the very real spiritual manifestation of the Kingdom occurring as we speak. If we keep our eyes pressed only toward the future, we often miss what’s offered right here, right now.

One day the Pharisees asked Jesus, “When will the Kingdom of God come?”

Jesus replied, “The Kingdom of God can’t be detected by visible signs. You won’t be able to say, ‘Here it is!’ or ‘It’s over there!’ For the Kingdom of God is already among you.” (Luke 17:20-21 NLT)

Wow. Digest that fully. Then put these prophecies into that perspective.

Why Pray and How: ACTS 11:19-12:25

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Acts 11:19-12:25

Praying before meals was a regular part of our practice throughout my childhood.  One Sunday afternoon our family sat down to eat our noon meal, which was probably pot roast from the crock-pot, typical Sunday fare in our home. We prayed and then began to eat. My little brother yelped and whimpered as he took a bite and said, “Daddy, the food is still too hot. You didn’t pray long enough.”

Why do we pray? How do we pray?  Like many things in scripture, prayer is a simple act that is steeped in complexity.  In this passage of Acts we see the story of Peter’s miraculous release from prison.   His release occurs as the Jerusalem believers gathered to pray earnestly for his safety. I’d like to take the time today to dive into the real value of prayer.

THE LORD’S PRAYER

This wouldn’t be a lesson on prayer without a visit to the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew.   In chapter 6 Jesus teaches his followers how to pray. Even though you may have heard a dozen sermons on The Lord’s Prayer, it’s wise to come here first, as a basis of context. Jesus says,

Pray like this: Our Father in Heaven, may your name be kept holy. May your Kingdom come soon. May your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven. Give us today the food we need, and forgive us our sins, as we have forgiven those who sin against us. And don’t let us yield to temptation, but rescue us from the evil one. (Matthew 6:9-13 NLT)

I have to admit, I have a tendency to resist this scripture because I have a natural aversion to rules when it comes to my faith, and I’ve held the bias that a memorized prayer was an empty prayer.  And that’s probably because most of the teachings I’ve heard on The Lord’s Prayer usually end up as a “how to” message on how to construct my prayers. Even if the pastor didn’t intended it, most folks walk away thinking, “Ok. So when I pray this week, I need to start like this, then move into this, and end with this.” They walk away with a formula!

Can you imagine the extensive amount of thought, energy, and emotion required to make a cake without any basic recipe to follow?  Formulas are extremely helpful when trying to recreate your favorite cake or calculate equations or perform heart surgery.  A formula decreases variability and increases quality.  But can you really apply this approach to relationships?  Absolutely not.  No one wants to feel like the variable in someone’s formula.  When you approach God using a formula, you’re essentially taking out the thought, energy and emotion, and all these things are required components to any relationship.  The quickest way to sever a connection to the Holy Spirit is by responding to him with a recipe.  But let’s not throw the baby out with the bath water.  When the disciples asked Jesus how to pray, he gave them the Lord’s Prayer.

BREAKING IT DOWN

I honestly don’t believe Jesus gave us this prayer so that we would necessarily pray these words exactly, nor to give us a recipe for what to include in our prayers; even though the words are great and the structure, worthy of duplication. He was revealing truth about himself and how we relate to him. When we absolutely believe these truths, it will most definitely impact our prayers and bring us into the presence of God. The problem arises when we don’t believe them.

1)May your kingdom come soon. When his disciples heard this, you know they were praying he would establish this kingdom by overthrowing the occupying Roman government. But there’s actually two components to the kingdom, a heavenly kingdom and an earthly one. The earthly kingdom pictured in the books of the prophets and revealed further in Revelation are pictures of what he’s prepared for us in heaven. Scripture promises a time when Jesus will return again to finally address the corruption of sin here on Earth and establish a kingdom. It will be yet one more picture of the splendor in the heavenly realm.  However, when Jesus died on the cross, rose again, and was seated at the right hand of the Father that too was picture of that heavenly kingdom. Because of his blood sacrifice, we are granted access to the power of that kingdom now. When we are praying for the kingdom, we are praying for the completion of all of his promises. We are also praying that we would walk in that kingdom now via the Holy Spirit. It’s like heaven invading earth through our hearts, and that’s exactly what happens when we are plugged into the Holy Spirit. He is our King, and his Kingdom has come into us, when we are abiding in Christ and he abides in us.

2) May your will be done on earth, as it is in heaven. Even here, Jesus is talking about these two economies, or households, heaven and earth. He has a will for heaven and one for earth and his purpose has always been to bring them into perfect union. I think we can all agree that they’re not unified today; there’s too much sin and corruption to think otherwise. His will, here on earth, includes each one of us, and if we submit to that will, our stories will play an eternal role in it’s unfolding. Our prayer should be that, through the power of the Holy Spirit, we would live our lives to accomplish his will. Praying in God’s will is not necessarily a lack of faith, quite the contrary. In fact the more we are in His presence and seek to understand His will, the bolder our prayers become.

3) Give us today the food we need. In some versions, the translation is, “give us this day our daily bread.” Bread is a common theme throughout the course of scripture from the manna given to Israel, to the miracle of the feeding of the 5,000. Jesus wants us to know that HE is our daily bread. He is our manna from heaven. Of all our needs, there is none greater than he. Of course we have needs that need to be met, and he knows exactly what they are.

 …your Father knows exactly what you need even before you ask him! (Matthew 6:8 NLT)

So why even ask? Because it brings us back to him as our resource. Our family discovered toxic mold during the holidays and we were wondering if we would lose our home. I was frantic and you can bet I prayed for resolution. God knew my needs, and he knew the solution. I don’t know if my prayer changed anything in that moment except myself.  In my fear, I could hear his voice say, “I have a solution in place. Trust me.” It brought me back to him. Sometimes we pray for what we need, so that we can hear His steady response. Let me be clear.  There are plenty of scriptural anecdotes telling of prayers that changed the Lord’s mind and altered outcomes.  They certainly can.  It all comes back to God.  He alone is our daily bread.

4) Forgive us our sins. Like so many things, I think this also has a heavenly and an earthly component if you’ll follow me for a minute. If you have already given your heart over to a faith in Jesus, then this prayer for forgiveness is one that has cleansed you from all unrighteousness. Scripture says that faith in Jesus is all you need for forgiveness, to thereby gain eternal life. In the heavenly realm this need only be done once. Because the blood of Christ is absolute, covering all sin (past, present, and future), there is only one forgiveness for salvation. The end. You do NOT need to pray for forgiveness repeatedly.

So why in the world do you think Jesus would include this in a daily prayer? Because I believe it’s a prayer for healing in the earthly realm. We’re not praying this to be saved. We all need to be healed of the sins that we’ve committed. We have not, and we will not live perfect, sinless lives. Continued confession and repentance, reminds us of our forgiveness and allows the Lord to work in our heart daily for healing. It allows us to transfer that burden of guilt to Jesus, and it closes an open door to Satan. I know I’m not alone in being tormented by the decisions of my past and present. I know by experience, that unconfessed sin simmers within me and wreaks havoc in all aspects of my life. I’ve learned that I can heal and receive the power of the Holy Spirit by making this a regular practice in my life.

5) As we have forgiven those who sin against us. This is also a prayer for healing. We need healing from the sins we’ve committed, and we need healing from the sins others have inflicted upon us. Anger can be so destructive and a very effective tool for Satan. Most of us know the concept of not letting the sun go down on our anger recorded by the Apostle Paul in Ephesians. This doesn’t mean that we must literally let go of the anger within 24 hours or less, but it’s establishing the principle of avoiding a grudge. Paul also says, be angry and do not sin, so that indicates there is such a thing as righteous anger. God doesn’t expect us to live up to a standard that he doesn’t hold for himself. Scripture records over and over the anger he has over sin. But righteous anger that brews into unforgiveness will always turn into a grudge, and that’s the open door for which Satan prowls. Knowing this, and praying for his supernatural power to help us forgive, even while the sting of pain still stabs, places us on the right path. Notice this phrase, “as we have forgiven those who sin against us,forgiven is in the past tense, while sin is present tense. Awfully optimistic for most of us, but if we will proactively pray in this direction it will become the past. It’s called praying in his will.

6) And don’t let us yield to temptation, but rescue us from the evil one. I’ve mentioned this evil one twice already. He’s real, and his number one goal is to derail each and every one of us. All the aforementioned parts of the Lord’s Prayer work together to answer this one.

The Lord’s Prayer isn’t necessarily a prayer to guide the structure of our prayers. Jesus put into words the essence of our relationship with him in prayer. It’s an authoritative, powerful relationship, because he is king; it’s a revelatory relationship because he wants to share his will and make himself known to us; it’s a provisionary relationship because of his overwhelming love for us; it’s a healing relationship because he makes us whole; and it’s a protective relationship because he is sovereign over all, even evil.

I find it incredibly interesting that this prayer never actually mentions thanksgiving while scripture is filled with advice toward gratitude. I wondered why. Then it occurred to me, when I really see the dramatic impact of this prayer, and I’m ushered into his presence, how can I not be thankful? He’s brought me into his kingdom, he’s revealed himself to me in astounding ways, he’s given me a purpose that will play into his will on earth AND heaven, he provided for me abundantly, he’s healed me from lifelong hurts, and he is waging battle against my enemy alongside me. I am humbled by and thankful for his grace. This is a prayer for our earthly world filled with eternal implications in the heavenly world, because it keeps our eyes fixed on the things above.

Coming back to Peter’s release from prison in this passage of Acts, we see no detail on what their prayers for Peter looked like exactly except that they were earnest.  These believers were fervent, faithful and filled with the Holy Spirit.  Peter’s release was so miraculous, the believers weren’t about to believe it actually happened. Peter wasn’t even so sure himself for a minute. But when it’s God’s will, there’s no shame in praying for it and claiming it.  Be ready to be blown away.

CHALLENGE

God called me to write, teach and speak two years ago. I have avoided praying for an abundance of opportunities to speak and teach, mainly for my fear of arrogance and my fear of failure. But if God has called me, and revealed his will to me, I NEED to be praying boldly for his will. My challenge to you this week, is to examine your own hearts. What are your prayers expressing? Are you claiming and worshipping Christ through all aspects of your relationship with him? Are you praying in his will that he has revealed to you and through you?

Additional verses on prayer.   Read and see what the Lord shows you in the context of the Lord’s Prayer.

Ephesians 6:18

Colossians 4:2

Matthew 7:7

James 4:2-3

James 5:16

I John 5:14

John 15:7